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I am grateful to 3 Ir J J Meile, Supeemtandent of Govemmeut Printing, for the aafostance he has given by undertaking the printing not only of this report but of some of thoee of the Provtuce* and State*.Moat of the diagrams m thi* Report have been reproduced at the Thomason Co Oege, Roorteo, and the work has been done with acenraov and precmioii. 4, Ctaaiaa^ Ckawk Irt Laca, Cktarttaj HTpabo Ikam k Oo. The Indian proas, while adnamg that information should not be withheld by the gensral pubho for fiflirig up the census schedules declared that all voluntary assistance m the way of acting as enumerators ahould be refused and, thou^ Hr Gandhi announced at the last moment that no obstacle ihou Jd be placed m the way of the census operabona it was too late for this pronouncement to have much effect and threrughout the Bombay Preeidencv and elsewhere the spirit of the non -co-opera bon movement afforded those desgtiated for census work jnit that eicaae which they required for whirl-mg a duty which they had from the first been anx Knis to avoid. Kama Kr Uaa k Boaa, T ibiu Oikad Sock aid Oa, Ddbi Bapdl, k 'na lalaaahaaal Baddkbk Book Daj^t. In many of the larger towns the greateat diffionlty was experienced m obt&xn- ing a snfficisnt staff of enumeratora and supervisor*.It was, owing to the necesarty of ecooomy nnfortuuatelv not poasihle to carry through the execution of a aomewhat elaborate map of India showing by colour the dittributian of the population which I had dettgned m confulta Uon with Colonel Tandy B. Section I—Introdnctory Remarks The statistics dealt with m this Report cover the whole of the territory known Scope of the Rcporu the Indian Empire, lying roughly between longitudes 61° to 101° E and latitudes 8° to 37° N , and embracing (a) the territories directly controlled by the Govern- ment of India, generally known as Bntish India, and (6) the Indian States, consisting of areas administered by Indian Chiefs m pohfcical relations with the central Govern- ment or with one or other of the provmcial Gkivemments Surrounded on the northern and eastern borders by the mdependent countnes of Persia, Afghanistan, Tibet, Nepal, Bhutan, China and Siam, the frontiers of the Empire are, except m the case of part of the eastern borders of Assam and Burma, well defined In the mountamous country on the eastern confines of these two provmces there he sparsely inhabited areas which have not yet been brought under regular adminis- trative control, and in only parts of these could any enumeration of the popula- tion be undertaken or any estimate made On the western and southern sides of India the coast hue naturally affords a well defined border Of the ad] acent islands Ceylon, though a British colony, lies outside the Indian Empire , but the small clusters of the Amimdivi and Laccadive Islands on the west and the larger groups of the Andamans and Nicobars m the Bay of Bengal form part of India, while the Aden Settlement, which is under the administrative control of the Bombay Government, forms pohtically, if not geographically, a part of the Indian Empire and was mcluded m the scope of the Indian Census Withm the boun- daries thus described, but outside the Indian Empire, he also the French and Portuguese Settlements, consistmg of the colonies of Pondicherry, Karikal, Chan- demagore, Mahe and Yanaan (French) and of Goa, Daman and Dm (Portuguese) A census of these territories was taken by their own Governments on the 18th March, 1921, in the French Settlements and in 1920 m the Portuguese Settlements, and the results of these censuses together with esti- mates of the area and population of some of the mdependent neighbourmg states which are pohtically most nearly connected with the Indian Empire are exhibited m the maiginal statement 2 The mam pohtical divisions of the Indian Empire are defined m the Political Divisions, map which forms a frontispiece to this volume Including the Chief Cominis- sionerships of De Du, Coorg, A]mer-Merwara and the Andamans, the Indian Empire has fifteen Bntish Provmces The last rearrangement of the eastern Provmces of India came mto force on the 1st April, 1912, but statistics of the Provmces of Assam, Bengal and Bihar and Onssa were separately shown m the reports of the Census of 1911 The Provmce of Delhi was constituted from the 1st October, 1912 In the mam tables the statistics of Delhi are separately shown, but m some of the less important tables they have been mcluded with those of the Punjab, and the report of the latter provmce contains a review ♦ The figures were not availnblo when this report went to press The population in 1911 was G02 564. Afghanistan Nepal Bhutan French Possessionfl Portuguese Possessions Area in Square miles Population 245,000 6,380 500 64,000 6,600,000 20,000 260 000 196 269 579 1 638 • 3 CHini B 1.

The Cenana Coranu Ntaner w ID indicate to Bapenntendeiita of Cenaoa Operattoaa th general Enea on whid theae ot^ninea might proceed and th ma t ftatiatira J infotmatton to be obtained Th Gomnment of India think it adeiaable that ac in the oaae of the thnograpkio ertqairfea prenoiul T’ ondertabui, an fficer m each diatnet ahooid be apetidcanx i Kxninated to undertake th co ITectton of aooh local Information aa may with th approval of the local Oovenimiint be indicated by the Pro- Tinc Bal 0ap«unton from an\ general distns«iion of industrial motliocls and icsults In the United rnnnues whate\cr information of this kind was collected was Iiandcd o\or In ^Ir hd\o to the liead of the local mdustnal dcpaitmcnt to be worked up in that dep ut incut and, hpeakmggcneralh , the efforts of the Census Superm- tendents. « hes giroc a good alcetdi of the movement B of popti Utwii and the economic oonditwcna of the Province, ilr Jacob wlio eucceeded hnn and finiabed the report, wea able m ^^ite of the abort tune at his dtepoea] to mntn btrte Botne valuable statastical diacctse Kjn on lines 1^111011 are new m Tntlinn (Vt^ ms literature In his report of the United Prorincee CScnsos Mr Edye, whfle- maraha Hmg hw facti and Bgarea mth oonaider Hble itfll, has imported a etram of humour and epigram which makea the volume thoroiiglily good reading Measre. V Blscoe I, A P Qovlnda Menon Esq Pro L Janld Xath Datta Mohd. B Chowdari Khoshl Mohammed* V R* Thyngarajalyar Eaq M. R* B Pandft Bril Jlwnn Lai B*A,, IB 0 8 Krishnamurthi Ayyar Esq xii nt THODtrorro K diaf Jttt m wiiioli ! C S CALCUTTA SUPERINTENDEN'J’ GOVERNJIENT PRINTING, INDIA 1924 T^BLE OF CONTENTS. Eoag and Ronghton have written eound report* of the condition* m Madia* and the Central p Ttmnce# and the material m the North Wcat Pnjvmce and Eajputena.149 CHAPTER m —Civil Condition The return of Civil Condition — General Conditions of Marriage — Restnctions on mamage — Mam statistics — Civil condition by religion — Civil condition by Provmces — Companson with previous censuses — Early mamage — ^Legisla- tion afiectmg mamage — The widowed — ^Re-mamage of widows — ^Mamage and longevity — The proportion of effective marriages and the average age of mothers — Summary Subsidiary Tables , 161 lfl4 / Tiiiai oi ooimim CILLrr EII Tm,— utm«(H£^ Lml M, WO Bnxd gndxfa. Most of the report* oontam appendicee m which it ha* been po#«ble to cany ditcus Kimi of mteroetmg matter mto dota Q which it would have been mcouvecient to indade m the text, and a h*t of aoiae of the more mtoieettng pajuaiges of tin* kmd, both m the text and the appen dices will be found m Appendix VUI to this Report.

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