Sexism in political campaigns

As the Treasury Department has been seeking nominations for iconic American women to place on the bill, people have suggested inspirational women like Sojourner Truth, Marie Curie, or Harriet Tubman.In September, CNN's Jake Tapper asked the GOP presidential candidates to name one woman worthy of the honor. However, it was apparently and two presidential candidates listed their family members.Kasich," the woman, 18-year-old Kayla Solsbak, wrote in the aftermath."I went because it's my civic duty to be an informed voter.In this case, there is little evidence that a male presidential contender who had not held a press conference for over 250 days would be free from criticism.This online exchange pointed out a much bigger issue in how all of us—reporters, pundits, surrogates, observers and even candidates—talk about and understand gender in political campaigns.

It sounded less offensive than the above tweet as a talking point in the debate, but not much better: "I had to work my way through school. I tried, early in my marriage, explaining to my wife why someone named Sallie Mae was taking

It sounded less offensive than the above tweet as a talking point in the debate, but not much better: "I had to work my way through school. I tried, early in my marriage, explaining to my wife why someone named Sallie Mae was taking $1,000 out of our bank account every month." Follow Prachi on Twitter.

Quoting author Sady Doyle, Salon columnist Amanda Marcotte noted that “the hysteria over Clinton’s having health problems is ‘uniquely tied to her gender.’” Vox’s Emily Crockett also weighed in, calling out the “subtle sexism” in the persistent questions over Hillary Clinton’s health.

Importantly, many of these commentaries recognize the nuance of gender’s influence in questions about and coverage of Clinton’s health, avoiding the all-or-nothing arguments that curb more enlightening dialogue.

Over the past week, campaign coverage has been dominated by Hillary Clinton’s health, raising questions not only about her physical well-being, but also her (and her campaign’s) transparency.

Some supporters and commentators have criticized the heightened scrutiny of Clinton’s health as sexist.

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It sounded less offensive than the above tweet as a talking point in the debate, but not much better: "I had to work my way through school. I tried, early in my marriage, explaining to my wife why someone named Sallie Mae was taking $1,000 out of our bank account every month." Follow Prachi on Twitter.Quoting author Sady Doyle, Salon columnist Amanda Marcotte noted that “the hysteria over Clinton’s having health problems is ‘uniquely tied to her gender.’” Vox’s Emily Crockett also weighed in, calling out the “subtle sexism” in the persistent questions over Hillary Clinton’s health.Importantly, many of these commentaries recognize the nuance of gender’s influence in questions about and coverage of Clinton’s health, avoiding the all-or-nothing arguments that curb more enlightening dialogue.Over the past week, campaign coverage has been dominated by Hillary Clinton’s health, raising questions not only about her physical well-being, but also her (and her campaign’s) transparency.Some supporters and commentators have criticized the heightened scrutiny of Clinton’s health as sexist.

,000 out of our bank account every month." Follow Prachi on Twitter.

Quoting author Sady Doyle, Salon columnist Amanda Marcotte noted that “the hysteria over Clinton’s having health problems is ‘uniquely tied to her gender.’” Vox’s Emily Crockett also weighed in, calling out the “subtle sexism” in the persistent questions over Hillary Clinton’s health.

Importantly, many of these commentaries recognize the nuance of gender’s influence in questions about and coverage of Clinton’s health, avoiding the all-or-nothing arguments that curb more enlightening dialogue.

Over the past week, campaign coverage has been dominated by Hillary Clinton’s health, raising questions not only about her physical well-being, but also her (and her campaign’s) transparency.

Some supporters and commentators have criticized the heightened scrutiny of Clinton’s health as sexist.

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